Scotish heraldry http://dunnoon.co.uk Scottish Heraldry Today Wed, 01 Feb 2017 03:47:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 History of the Court of the Lord Lyon http://dunnoon.co.uk/history-court-lord-lyon/ http://dunnoon.co.uk/history-court-lord-lyon/#respond Wed, 01 Feb 2017 03:47:57 +0000 http://dunnoon.co.uk/?p=4387 The Court of the Lord Lyon, established in the fourteenth century, is a court in Scotland tasked with the regulation of heraldry. Lord Lyon, the one and only King of Arms, is Judge of the Court and Head of Heraldic Executive. This court is responsible for maintaining grants of arms’ register, also called the Public […]

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The Court of the Lord Lyon, established in the fourteenth century, is a court in Scotland tasked with the regulation of heraldry. Lord Lyon, the one and only King of Arms, is Judge of the Court and Head of Heraldic Executive. This court is responsible for maintaining grants of arms’ register, also called the Public Register of All Arms & Bearings. It also keeps all genealogies’ records in Scotland. The Court of the Lord Lyon is an integral part of Oxford’s long history and has the Lord Lyon King of Arms as its head. The Lord Lyon King of Arms has to be qualified at law because he has criminal jurisdiction as far as heraldic matters are concerned. The court is tightly intertwined with the legal system of Scotland and has a Procurator Fiscal, its own prosecutor. The holder of the position of the Lord Lyon King of Arms has the responsibility of attending the inauguration and later coronation of the King among others.

The Court of the Lord Lyon

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Coat of Arms Banner and Vexillology http://dunnoon.co.uk/coat-arms-banner-vexillology/ http://dunnoon.co.uk/coat-arms-banner-vexillology/#respond Thu, 03 Nov 2016 23:55:39 +0000 http://dunnoon.co.uk/?p=4383 Coat of arms banner is basically a flag which bears the same picture as a coat of arms. What does it look like then? Well, it’s a square or oblong piece of fabric, slightly larger than a pennon. The emblems painted on the banner of arms are identical with owner’s shield of a full heraldic […]

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Coat of arms banner is basically a flag which bears the same picture as a coat of arms. What does it look like then? Well, it’s a square or oblong piece of fabric, slightly larger than a pennon. The emblems painted on the banner of arms are identical with owner’s shield of a full heraldic achievement. Even though it’s sometimes called a “banner”, it’s not quite the same thing as a banner, which we define as a flag held during the battle. The difference between a coat of arms banner and a heraldic flag is that the first one is not used ceremoniously. Although it can be adapted as a national flag – the best example would be the flag of Iraq. Another great example is Swiss flag, which, by the way, holds the 3rd positions in http://www.joe.co.uk/life/the-10-best-flags-in-the-world/79983>The Worlds best top-ten flags Ranking presented by vexillologists. In the first place is the flag of the United Kingdom, on the second – beautiful, bottle-green flag of Saudi Arabia.

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Heraldic Mythical Animals – The Scottish Unicorn http://dunnoon.co.uk/heraldic-mythical-animals-scottish-unicorn/ http://dunnoon.co.uk/heraldic-mythical-animals-scottish-unicorn/#respond Thu, 27 Oct 2016 19:17:23 +0000 http://dunnoon.co.uk/?p=4378 The unicorn, a magnificent white, horse- or goat-like beast. Its identifying feature is a long, spiralling and pointed horn on its forehead, and strong legs equipped with cloven hoofs. It is often seen as a symbol of purity, joy, grace and innocence. A mystical and powerful creature that could heal sickness or pain with its […]

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The unicorn, a magnificent white, horse- or goat-like beast. Its identifying feature is a long, spiralling and pointed horn on its forehead, and strong legs equipped with cloven hoofs. It is often seen as a symbol of purity, joy, grace and innocence. A mystical and powerful creature that could heal sickness or pain with its magical horn. During the Medieval Period, it was depicted by many artists, as a creature that could only have been captured by a virgin maiden. The Celtic mythology in Scotland during this period recognised the unicorn as a symbol of beauty, courage and freedom. The unicorn became an iconic Scottish symbol, especially since Scotland fought bravely for its independence. There’s an early version of a Scottish Coat of Arms in the 12th century that has the mythical creature. In the 15th century under the reign of James III of Scotland, their coins also featured the unicorn. Originally there were two, but later one was changed into a lion when the Scottish united with the English. The Scottish Unicorn is a white, horse-like creature, with cloven hooves, a white mane and a tail like that of a lion’s. It also has the characteristic horn on its forehead. The Scottish Unicorn is also depicted with chains around it. The chains are supposed to keep the beast from running wild and to tame the dangerous beauty it holds. It is a beautiful creature that truly represents the magical nature of Scotland, bold, proud and fierce. want to find a unicorn? A short term loan from ferratum.co.uk can help fund a trip to do so

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Scottish heraldry made easy, or maybe not http://dunnoon.co.uk/scottish-heraldry-made-easy-maybe-not/ http://dunnoon.co.uk/scottish-heraldry-made-easy-maybe-not/#respond Tue, 20 Sep 2016 15:00:15 +0000 http://dunnoon.co.uk/?p=4362 Some of us at least have heard about the sale of plots of land on the moon. Although this must be considered more of a joke, than something anyone would take seriously, a similar service is offered in Scotland. You can buy a small plot for £30, and you are sent a certificate of ownership, […]

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Some of us at least have heard about the sale of plots of land on the moon. Although this must be considered more of a joke, than something anyone would take seriously, a similar service is offered in Scotland. You can buy a small plot for £30, and you are sent a certificate of ownership, with your name, an ordinance survey of the plot, and perhaps a cheeky title of; ‘Lord’, ‘Laird, or ‘Lady’ next to your name. Of course, this doesn’t really give you that title, but some people have interpreted this the wrong way, seeking to put the titles on such things as their credit cards. Authorities in Scotland have had to denounce all these fake titles, stating that they hold no legal basis. It is merely a charitable way for foreigners to invest in the nature of Scotland. One company, the Highland Titles Nature Reserve at Glencoe Wood, state that the profit from their sales will only ever go to conservation of the nature reserves in their area. Scottish heraldry made easy it seems, but these are not real titles that are being sold, merely gimmicks; a practical and creative way of generating income. Buying Scottish land doesn’t make you a Lord or Lady, but it can help with the preservation of lands that have been abused in the past; this is never a bad thing. If ever there was Scottish heraldry made easy, it isn’t this way. The laws governing heraldry and the coat-of-arms are actually very strict in Scotland. It is illegal for anyone to wear the coat-of-arms of a certain clan, or family, without showing evidence of genetic ties, and residing in Scotland.

 

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Scottish heraldry symbols meanings http://dunnoon.co.uk/scottish-heraldry-symbols-meanings/ http://dunnoon.co.uk/scottish-heraldry-symbols-meanings/#respond Wed, 31 Aug 2016 00:05:28 +0000 http://dunnoon.co.uk/?p=4369 Have you ever wondered what the meaning behind symbols displayed on the coats of arms is? Scottish heraldry symbols meanings are slightly different from what you could have learned already about English or Irish armorial bearings. Some elements of an escutcheon are seen more often amongst the Scots: a tressure which is a kind of […]

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Have you ever wondered what the meaning behind symbols displayed on the coats of arms is? Scottish heraldry symbols meanings are slightly different from what you could have learned already about English or Irish armorial bearings. Some elements of an escutcheon are seen more often amongst the Scots: a tressure which is a kind of subordinaries and symbolises protection and a thistle which is a floral symbol of the country. An extraordinarily complex and highly changeable system of cadencies is also a distinctive feature, but for beginners, it might be difficult to spot. Cadency is added to the arms father passes to his sons and cannot be removed as long as the plain arms bearer is alive. That’s because according to the law there can’t be two men wearing the same heraldic achievements. Mussels as a charge are extremely rare anywhere outside of Scotland, and even there they are displayed very rarely- you can see them for example on the Musselburgh’s’ arms. I hope this short prelude to the Scottish heraldry symbols meanings, answered some of your questions. There is so much more to be said, though! If you’re curious what else can a shield tell about its owner, visit us again!

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Heraldry http://dunnoon.co.uk/heraldry/ Sun, 24 Jul 2016 20:20:16 +0000 http://dunnoon.co.uk/?p=4356 The notion of Heraldry in Scotland has always been strong. It is, of course, the clan system that has given Scotland such a rich tradition of heraldry with the many different warring families requiring their own unique markings and identity. The Heraldry Society of Scotland was founded in 1977 and has membership from around the […]

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The notion of Heraldry in Scotland has always been strong. It is, of course, the clan system that has given Scotland such a rich tradition of heraldry with the many different warring families requiring their own unique markings and identity. The Heraldry Society of Scotland was founded in 1977 and has membership from around the globe. Scotland is one of a few where a court of Heraldry still exists and is in operation today. In today’s world of marketing and commerce, many Scottish businesses are seeing the value in identity and using the coats-arms symbolism in their logos and branding. Heraldry, a business for today it would seem as more multinational companies, institutions and organisational bodies in Scotland are drawing on the powerful tradition to empower their businesses. Stella McCartney and Adidas design uniform for Rio Olympics with Heraldy in mind material exists to inform any novice on the subject of this science that has such a long and distinguished history. A history that clearly is alive and well. Heraldry, a business for today for those wishing to actually draw on that strength of identity within Scottish society.

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Kilts and Tartans: Scottish national dress http://dunnoon.co.uk/kilts-tartans-scottish-national-dress/ Wed, 20 Jul 2016 14:35:22 +0000 http://dunnoon.co.uk/?p=4347 Kilts and tartans are made from several feet of fabric and folded into loose pleats and then fastened in place with a leather belt. They are made from tartan fabric and identified with a particular Scottish Clan. To this day, people are filled with intrigue as they still wonder what Scotsmen wear under their kilts. […]

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Kilts and tartans are made from several feet of fabric and folded into loose pleats and then fastened in place with a leather belt. They are made from tartan fabric and identified with a particular Scottish Clan. To this day, people are filled with intrigue as they still wonder what Scotsmen wear under their kilts. That aside, kilts and tartans, Scotland’s national dress, are stylish and fascinating. The history of the kilt goes right back to the 6th century, but relatively recent a Derbyshire based company known as Tweeds with Style have come out with a Tartan for Derbyshire . The colours of this kilt – red, green, white, black, blue and yellow are representative of the Scottish countryside, designed to tie in with ‘Made in Derbyshire 2015’. In fact, a weaver in Belper produced a hand-woven piece to show the Scots what the next kilt would look like. The Derbyshire tartan is a district tartan registered with the Scottish Tartan Register.

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The Meaning Behind the Coats of Arms http://dunnoon.co.uk/meaning-behind-coats-arms/ Mon, 11 Jul 2016 14:11:20 +0000 http://dunnoon.co.uk/?p=4336 Heraldry in the Scottish tradition is in many ways similar to how it is practised in England and other places in western Europe, but there are also differences. Differences that can be seen when looking at coats of arms. To understand the meaning behind the coats of arms, you have to look at its characteristics […]

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Heraldry in the Scottish tradition is in many ways similar to how it is practised in England and other places in western Europe, but there are also differences. Differences that can be seen when looking at coats of arms. To understand the meaning behind the coats of arms, you have to look at its characteristics and the symbols that are used. A coat of arms consists typically of a motto, cadency, badges, crests, heiresses, and quarterings; each element helps identify the meaning behind the coats of arms. The motto is one of the most visual differences between Scottish heraldry and other heraldic styles. The scroll that displays the motto is in Scottish tradition, almost always positioned above the crest of the coat of arms. Just as there are some differences in style between the traditions, variations can also occur in the interpretation of the symbols. When researching specific symbols to understand the meaning of them, it is imperative to make sure the information is based on the Scottish tradition. Indentifying friends and foes through a Coat of arms is a fascinating thing to do as insights into their history can be revealed. We welcome you to read our other articles and visit this website regularly to learn more about this fascinating art form.

The meaning behind the coats of arms

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Special Heraldic Flags http://dunnoon.co.uk/special-heraldic-flags/ Sat, 02 Jul 2016 14:10:33 +0000 http://dunnoon.co.uk/?p=4334 It seems that laws surrounding heraldic flags have become blurred, and Scottish football clubs are now trying to scrap old laws which ban the use of certain elements on flags such as lions, shields or thistles. Scottish football clubs in legal battle over using heraldic crests have meant that some clubs will be forced to […]

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It seems that laws surrounding heraldic flags have become blurred, and Scottish football clubs are now trying to scrap old laws which ban the use of certain elements on flags such as lions, shields or thistles. Scottish football clubs in legal battle over using heraldic crests have meant that some clubs will be forced to adopt a new badge and may only use their current crest for a few months longer. These heraldic flags with coats of arms are now being caught up in a feud of the flags because of a complaint made by a fan of a rival club. This isn’t the first time legal battles are raging because Kilmarnock and St Mirren also had to alter their badges in the 1990s for being in breach of Lord Lyon rules. We’ve all witnessed the passionate loyalty and rivalry with football clubs, and fans are always looking for ways to bring rival clubs to their knees, and in this case over the use of unregistered arms.

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